Peking mystery

*
Stealing a Freudian duck
can provoke after dinner debates,
peeking Peking mysteries
to resolve over Sigmund cigars.

Nobody is ever quite sure
with complete certainty
who indeed was the foul deed
or why there’s an orange segment
missing at dessert, again,
and is that fruit significant?

All their conjecture is stated
in crisply, heated conversation
about rich origins of sauces,
and how that affects
the personality of the duck.

When it was most alive,
and contently, consistently
blissfully unaware
of the waddle in its walk
before the cooked-up analysing
made the gourmet table.

Advertisements

3 thoughts on “Peking mystery

  1. Uncle Tree says:

    I’ve read this twice now, Matt…
    and I still haven’t quite figured it out.
    Especially, “who indeed was the foul deed”.

    But I liked the way you lined this up,
    “…contently, consistently
    blissfully unaware
    of the waddle in it’s walk”

    Can’t say that I’ve ever eaten a duck.
    But you’ve made me to feel awfully sorry
    for this little quack in the pot.

    And speaking of mysteries…I’m still waiting
    for you to show me those poems you talked
    about during ‘A Celestial Arousal’. But
    I’m a patient man. Really, I am.

    Thanks again for all your help, good fellow!

  2. Matt says:

    UT, it’s just a silly piece about Freudian analysis on the origins of behaviour which is this case is about a dish of Peking duck. Usually in that branch of psychiatry there’s some ‘foul dead’ that happened to the individual at some early point in their life which explains some hang up or other. The foul deed as it were here was the duck’s head hitting the chopping block, a rather defining moment!

    It’s also a metaphor for Freud’s ideas in general, the duck in question could be a ‘someone’ who was perhaps better off without every aspect of the personality being diced up and applied sauce. Sigmund had some dreadful theories I think, damaging ones and his daughter was even more deranged in certain areas.

    I admit, it’s not a particularly good poem as I think it’s lacking something, but I hit a dead end. It’s one I will come back to and work on.

  3. Matt says:

    “And speaking of mysteries…I’m still waiting
    for you to show me those poems you talked
    about during ‘A Celestial Arousal’. But
    I’m a patient man. Really, I am.”

    I had forgotten. One is called “Blae Tarn” which is not so much archaic, but more sort of an attempt at mock olde English. I have it somewhere. I liked it at the time, but now I look back at it and think “Oh dear” from whence did this come from? It’s about a battle skirmish set in northern England, in around the 11th century. I’ll put it here as a page and send you a link (I have to find it from another archive)

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s