Nothing is what it seems

~ under the bed.
which is to say
under the dense mattress,
where carpet border
meets wire frame springs,
and I can breathe
in a space I reach for
subconsciously;
once able to crawl there.

Tonight slides under
the top-most pillow,
the nearest I’ll get
to tunneling my way
into ice-bound Narnia.
Pushing back linen
like plush wardrobe fur coats.
Except no fauns found here
to welcome by lamplight,
in cold comfort
and weathered seasons,
in grown-up dreams.

It snows in the dark
each breath noticeable,
inhale today, exhale
into tomorrow for warmth
to be returned;
the day after the thaw,
chills will not prevail.

In another space,
I edge past a white witch
which bullies me
into not quite believing
in myself, her icicle aim
to leave me in perpetual winter.
Yet a lantern
is pressed between my palms
by a lion, Aslan.

Eyes with glimmer that he needs
to sustain as fireside coals.

Usually he shows up
one page before
his untamed illustration,
paws still wet with artist’s colour,
his paint trail tail shows the route
to pass safely
the forests beyond cares.

And a waking begins,
only is it noticeable
C S Lewis is here too
under the storyline trees
still typing the scene;
he wants me to continue
towards “Once upon this time”,
close the chapter
on winter land emptiness,
and write of a melt to come.

I’m not too sure about this poem. It’s based upon
the CS Lewis story “The Lion, the Witch & the Wardrobe”,
where a witch prevents winter from ending or spring
from beginning (whichever way you wish to look at it)

* The italic phrases aren’t from the book, they’re just my own
turns of phrases that possibly might be found there
(if that makes sense)

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3 thoughts on “Nothing is what it seems

  1. slpmartin says:

    A rather nice verse…it reminded me how several films have borrowed from CS Lewis story “The Lion, the Witch & the Wardrobe”in the recent past.

  2. Uncle Tree says:

    I’m not at all familiar with that story, Matt,
    nor have I seen the movie “Narnia”, but I like
    your idea of C.S. Lewis sustaining the scene
    by continuously writing from wherever he is now.

    In the beginning, first off I thought about
    “Once Upon A Mattress”, a play we did in high school.
    It was as if you were playing the part of the pea.

    I will say this, that witch teamed up with El Nino
    this year, but their time has come for spring has sprung.

    I was especially drawn to these two phrases:

    It snows in the dark
    each breath noticeable,
    inhale today, exhale
    into tomorrow for warmth
    to be returned;
    the day after the thaw,
    chills will not prevail.

    .

    Usually he shows up
    one page before
    his untamed illustration,
    paws still wet with artist’s colour,
    his paint trail tail shows the route
    to pass safely
    the forests beyond cares.

    .

    I’m also reminded of a Moody Blues song,
    but I can’t for the life of me remember
    the name of it. Something about Phileas (sp)
    and his stead bringing the warmth the
    countryside needs. Oh, nevermind. 🙂

    Good day, sir!

  3. Matt says:

    Thanks Slipmartin and UT.

    The basis for the poem was the film “Shadowlands” I don’t know if you’ve seen it, but it tells the later life story of C.S Lewis. He was very much an esteemed intellectual persona in his time, and also one that tended to remove himself from the attentions of others, socially reserved you could say and somewhat of a difficult person to attempt to drop down the emotional barriers towards friendships. Very much a loner in an ivory tower (at least the way the biography portrays him) He did find love though, and began to see life from a new vantage point, that of another human being’s will to live and love. Yet, sadly she contracted cancer. They still married despite knowing their time together was limited leading to some very touching scenes in the film.

    His wife dying of cancer was what I was thinking about as the darker seam behind the poem. A coming to terms with a sadness such as that trauma was what I wanted the piece to be about really, in that even in the hardest of emotional winters a spring will eventually show another side to life.

    The poem gives me an excuse to add an illustration of Aslan. 🙂

    UT, I read the Narnia series as a kid. They’re stories of high adventure and courage in fantastical, magical lands (with equally fantastical creatures) which are traveled into via our own world through curious means. In the case of the aforementioned book, it was a large wardrobe lined with thick, fur coats that lead to an ice bound Narnia under a witch’s spell. It’s quite handy having a fur coat when you enter such a land. I’ve always liked the plot neatness of that. The girl who enters first sees a lighted lampost in a clearing in the trees, and the story begins to unfold.

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